"Life of Vivian Maier" by Anne Marks: the review by Serena Dandini
Serena Dandini

Serena Dandini (photo by Gianmarco Chieregato).

THEOn June 5th we “celebrated”, so to speak, the world day for the environment, I am not saying that it has gone unnoticed but almost.

Of course there have been the usual articles by valiant journalists and scholars who have reminded us that since 1972 – that is, from the world UN conference on the subject, 50 years ago, the first to warn us of the drift that awaited us – little and nothing has been done. .

Some countries have launched measures and promise to implement others but the perception in the collective imagination remains that of a side problem that yes, it must be faced, but in a spiral of benaltrism it is always pushed back to the bottom of the list of urgencies.

With the war, then, it seems almost a sacrilege to talk about the almost irreversible climate change and the concentration of CO2 in the earth’s atmosphere which in fifty years has increased by one hundred parts per million and continues to rise thanks to the unstoppable emissions of fossil fuels.

What if a nuclear warhead explodes? Other than the environment, we all die and so be it. And we will talk about the climate tomorrow, which today is not really air.

Nobody realizes, myself first, that the climate is like a bomb but a clockwork and unfortunately the ticking of this device is submerged by our unbridled consumerism that no longer allows us to think clearly.

Don’t you feel that hot? Rome looks like Bombay and in the Mediterranean Sea there are now tropical jellyfishyet we note these anomalies as occasional ailments and cannot give up exaggerated gusts of air conditioning as if they were prescribed by the charter of human rights.

The environment is like an actor with a bad press office, he is talked about occasionally and with arguments that are not too convincing and after a few hours each alarm is archived.

“The great blindness. Climate change and the unthinkable “by Amitav Ghosh (Neri Pozza)

Not even literature manages to make this drama attractive, which risks upsetting our planet, the writer Amitav Ghosh points out with passion in a beautiful book, The great blindness. Climate change and the unthinkable (Neri Pozza), a heartfelt essay from a few years ago that struck me a lot because it clearly describes our inability to be passionate about what is likely to become the end of our world, at least as we know it.

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It would be encouraging if the writers brought about a change capable of opening the eyes of homo sapiens … That so much sapiens is no longer.

All the articles by Serena Dandini.

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#benaltrism #hurts #Earth #Donna

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