Libeskind: I play chess with light and shadow

Author of numerous architectural works, from the Jewish Museum in Berlin to the urban restructuring project of the area destroyed by the attacks of 11 September 2001, the Ground Zero in New York, Daniel Libeskind certainly needs no introduction. Although the public knows him above all for his emblematic buildings, he expresses his creative flair in different fields. The forays into the world of design are lively and varied and range from radiators to bathroom fixtures, to sofas and kitchens. Projects that are reminiscent of small-scale architecture as they perfectly encapsulate the well-known features of his style, including the continuous use of acute angles, sloping surfaces and fragmentations. And a pinch of Italian spirit: “I don’t follow market trends but I find inspiration in music, history, art and literature”, he tells us. “I love Milan and Italian design, the rich history and tradition of craftsmanship is always a source of inspiration for me“.

Architect Daniel Libeskind, born in Lodz in Poland on May 12, 1946, lives and works in New York.  He declares to love Milan very much (photo Stefan Ruiz)

Architect Daniel Libeskind, born in Lodz in Poland on May 12, 1946, lives and works in New York. He declares to love Milan very much (photo Stefan Ruiz)

The collection of sideboards is no exception Libeskind022 presented for the first time on the occasion of the Furniture expo. A series born from the meeting with Febal House. «We have been working in the Lombard capital for a long time and our project in CityLife has brought us closer to the fantastic Italian design companies. It was a natural collaboration with Febal Casa as it represents the epitome of Italian quality and forward-looking design », says the architect. This line shows us how important furniture is in helping to make light become the protagonist of the environment. The storage units are characterized by suggestive surfaces which, thanks to the three-dimensional processing, take shape and form, creating reflections and optical effects that vary according to the lighting. And in fact this sort of chess game between light and shadow influences the perception we have of colors.

A detail of the three-dimensional processing

A detail of the three-dimensional processing

“I believe in individual experience in design,” comments Libeskind. «The surface of the cupboards is constantly changing and communicates with the surrounding environment. Light represents the democracy of the house, the unique lived experience of the owner “, continues to explain the architect. The collection also brings together past and present: it mentions the ancient art of wood carving and the result of this process recalls the complex geometries of the projects signed by the American creative of Polish origin.
How did you manage to transfer the typical lines of your works into interior design?

“As an architect, I always look to the future but we have to remember what came before and honor it in a contemporary way,” he replies. «So for Febal Casa we examined the typical wardrobe and the origins of its purpose. I wanted to design something that wasn’t static but was also protective. The lines of the sideboards are active. Almost ephemeral, they will appear different at various times of the day », he concludes.

The high version sideboard with two doors;  thanks to an outfitting kit it can be transformed into a bar cabinet

The high version sideboard with two doors; thanks to an outfitting kit it can be transformed into a bar cabinet

Personalization is another key word. The sideboards are available in different colors and in three different types to be enriched with drawers, pull-out shelves and a bar fitting kit.

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